African Latinos and Americans remain far less likely than whites to have their blood sugar in order.

Reference: Archives of Internal Medicine , Vol. 167 No. 17, Sept. 24, 2007.. African American and Latino diabetics far less likely to blood sugar in order Despite decades of advances in diabetes care, African Latinos and Americans remain far less likely than whites to have their blood sugar in order, even with the help of medications, a new representative research finds nationally. That puts them at a much higher risk of blindness, heart attack, kidney failure, foot amputation and additional long-term diabetes problems. The comprehensive new national study of middle-aged and old adults, released in the Sept. 24 issue of the Archives of Internal Medicine , was performed by a team from the University of Michigan and the VA Ann Arbor Healthcare System. The scholarly study paperwork the persistence of strong racial and ethnic disparities in diabetes control, which have been observed for many years and donate to the much higher influence of diabetes on those two ethnic groupings.Also, staying hydrated helps to prevent drops in blood pressure.’ Related StoriesPharmacy-led glycemic control plan improves outcomes for surgical sufferers with diabetesJumping genes: a marker for early cancer diagnosis? An interview with Dr KazazianDeaths from avoidable risk factors: an interview with Dr Ali Mokdad, IHMEBlood Vessel Changes Over time the elasticity of arteries starts to decline and this can affect blood circulation. Similar to blood circulation pressure medication, this may cause people to become dizzy or lightheaded when changing positions, which can result in falls. ‘Without the squeezing of the arteries, blood flow does not return to the heart from distant areas of the body as effectively, especially from the legs.